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Ohio sites up for inclusion on National Register

The National Register of Historic Places lists locations worthy of preservation because of their significance in American history, architecture, archaeology, engineering and culture. In addition to Hanford Village black vets subdivision, here are some other Ohio places recently approved for nomination to the register:

— Cleveland Centre Historic District. Located in the Flats district along the east bank of the Cuyahoga River, the proposed Cleveland Centre Historic District includes 58 buildings, a silo and nine bridges associated with the history of transportation, commerce and light industry in Cleveland from 1851 to 1963.

— Julian and Kokenge Co. building, Columbus. Founded in Cincinnati in 1897, the company opened a Columbus factory in 1921 and grew into one of the nation's largest makers of women's shoes.

— Granville M. Bulen House and Farm Complex, Pickaway County. The site is representative of Pickaway County's agricultural and architectural history in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and includes a 1901 Queen Anne-style house and related farm buildings.

— Big Four Depot, Middletown, Butler County. Completed in 1909 by the Big Four division of the New York Central Railroad, the depot is nominated because of its association with an early 20th-century period of industrial growth and economic prosperity in Middletown.

—Wright Memorial Public Library, Oakwood, Montgomery County. Built in 1939, the library has local architectural significance as an example of the work of Dayton architects Schenck and Williams, who were responsible for designing much of the civic architecture in Oakwood.

—Tower East, Shaker Heights, Cuyahoga County. Completed in 1968, the 12-story Tower East has local architectural significance as the only Ohio work of master architect Walter Gropius (1883-1969).

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Source: Ohio Historical Society

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