Bellefontaine Examiner

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Clinic to tackle concussion issues head-on

August marks the beginning of high school sports in Ohio, and with it the opportunity for sports-related concussions as well.

Concussion

West Liberty-Salem’s Kate Detwiler, seen in this 2010 file photo, wears soccer head gear during a game against Benjamin Logan. In 2008 the National Federation for State High School associations approved three different brands of headbands to be worn in matches in an effort to reduced concussions. Some local athletes have worn the head gear, but players are not required to by the OHSAA. 9EXAMINER FILE PHOTO)

In an effort to try and increase awareness and education, Logan County Health Commissioner Boyd Hoddinott, MD, MPH., is partnering with Mary Rutan Physical Rehabilitation Center to pilot Logan County’s first concussion clinic to be conducted at the rehab center, 2200 Timber Trail.

A concussion is defined as a complex pathophysiologic process affecting the brain induced by traumatic biomechanical forces secondary to direct or indirect forces to the head.

According to the Center for Disease Control, more than 10 percent of the 30 million children and adolescents who participate in sports in the USA experience sports-related concussions.

Of that number, more than half of these concussions are unreported or misdiagnosed. With those diagnosed with concussions, 10 to 15 percent of them will experience persistent disabling problems, although about 85 percent will recover fully in seven to 14 days. Youths with no previous concussions took on an average of 12 days to recover, while those with any history of concussion took 22 days to recover. Youths with a history of a concussion within a year took an average of 35 days to recover.

The CDC statistics also suggest more than 200 sports-related concussions occur in Logan County each year.

“There can be a lot of misdiagnosis and confusion when it comes to concussions. Many people think a person needs to be knocked unconscious for it to be a concussion, which is untrue. We’re hoping with this program we can solve those issues,” said Dr. Hoddinott.

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